Authority
Posted On:
Friday, February 19, 2016

 

 The definition for authority is the power or right to give orders, make decisions, and enforce obedience. In the class room we as teachers have  authority over the students. We have the authority for many reasons, but it can be summed up in one simple sentence known as the DCAC authority statement. “I understand school officials are given authority over me because of the responsibility they have for my safety and my academic and social education.” All of our students must quote and understand this one sentence in order to return to their home school. My question now becomes, if our students can say this sentence and fully understand it, then why do we have so many students who havee endless problems accepting authority?  

Why are school officials given authority over students? First and foremost, we are given authority over our students for their safety. I tell my students and my group almost daily that my number one job is to return them home to their parents or guardians the same way they showed up. I should protect them and keep them safe at all times. If I fail to do this, I am failing at my job. I should protect them and keep them safe in the same manner I would my own son. The second reason is for their academic education. I should teach my students and help them learn all they can learn in my classroom. The third reason is for their social education. I should model how a person should carry and present themselves in a social environment. I should give them all the tools they need to succeed. If I fail at one of the three of these, then I am failing at my job. 

I take my job seriously and I take the safety, academic, and social education of your child seriously. The problem I am noticing is that many of our young people and students are not taking their safety, academic, and social education seriously at all. They think it is all a big game and that we as educators do not know what we are talking about. One thing I try to hammer home is that life is not a game, and this world does not care how sensitive you are when things do not go your way. People are put in authority over you for a reason, and everyone has someone they have to listen to if they want to be successful. We at DCAC hear many of our students say phrases such as, but are not limited to (I’m not doing that, you can’t make me, and can’t anyone tell me what to do). 

Sometimes my wife tells me I expect too much out of my son and that he is only two. When she does this I explain to her that if we make excuses for him now, we will be making excuses for him when he is 18. I have high expectations for my students and I expect them to accept the authority that has been given to me over them, and when they do make a mistake or do something they are not supposed to, I expect them to take whatever discipline is given like a young lady or young man. Far too many of our students are too sensitive to simple correction and make big things out of little things. They do not think we should correct their behavior and therefore disrespect the authority we are given over them for their safety, academic, and social education. 

 

Trotter, Richard 

DCAC Social Studies 

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